Semi-Truck Accident Facts

Semi-trucks, or more properly semi-trailer trucks, are those behemoths on the road you don’t want to be in a truck accident with. They are huge, gleaming and 18 wheels worth of heavy steel that can spell catastrophe if you ever get into a collision with one.

The big rig, or a semi as it is also referred to in the US, is a towing engine attached to semi-trailers for carrying cargo. The semi-trailer is attached on a metal projection of the towing engine, or tractor, just forward of the rear-end axle so that some of the weight is carried by the tractor. This makes it distinct from the usual truck and trailer where the trailer is attached completely behind the prime mover.

There are different configurations to a semi-trailer truck, and carrying purposes. Common types include tankers (for gas and oil, mostly), reefers, vans, side lifts and flatbeds (for containers without wheels). There are specialty trailers that are refrigerated, heated or pressurized. Some even have movable wheels enabling them to comply with weight distribution laws as necessary. Because they often travel interstate, semi-trailer truck drivers must be conversant with the laws governing each state to avoid trouble.

You will often see these lumbering giants on the highway as they speed interstate or haul cargo to airports or piers for international freight forwarding. They represent an important part of commercial trading, which makes them an essential part of the economy. But that doesn’t make them any less dangerous on the road. There are smart ways to handle a semi on the highway, but sometimes accidents still happen. If you have been in a truck accident with a semi and sustained injuries and extensive property damage, you may be able to claim for additional compensation over and above what you are entitled to from your insurer. Contact a truck accident lawyer as soon as possible to know your options.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *